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Do You Want to Prevent Workplace Injuries?

Since 1992 I have been working in the area of safety with the goal of preventing workplace injuries.  I have seen individuals suffer, families impacted, and companies close facilities causing people to lose their jobs because of workplace injuries.  It is my personal goal and our company’s goal to bring understanding to injury prevention.  That is why in 2008 I designed my Hazard Recognition and Control Workshop.
Hazard recognition is the cornerstone of any safety effort.  Hazard recognition training is a vehicle to educate everyone in the recognition, evaluation, and control of hazards.  But hazard recognition training must go beyond just showing pictures.  Participants need to understand the basic requirement of “seeing” the hazard in order to recognize it and taking action to control.  To do this they must realize the magnitude of the risk presented by the hazard.
Evaluation of the hazard is a key motivator for “seeing the hazard and taking action.”  To many people think that hazards are the responsibility of the safety department, supervision, and management.  Hazard recognition and control is the responsibility of everyone in the organization.  What I found in my research is that people who have been injured by a hazard didn’t really see it as a risk.  When a person recognizes and evaluates the hazard as a real threat to them and others, they will take action to control it.
Controlling the hazard through abatement,  engineering, rules, and personal protective equipment is how hazards are controlled.  In the past 20 plus years people have been taught to, “Just follow the rules and you won’t get hurt.”  The problem is the people don’t like to be told to follow the rules and this immediately creates a barrier to action.  In my workshop each individual is engaged in the discussion.  This is not a compliance class to just “check-off” a box for OSHA, although it does meet hazard recognition and control training requirements.
It has been my privilege to educate thousands of people to recognize, evaluate and control hazards.  Because of the amount of requests for this workshop we decided to increase our efforts.  Last year I trained Stan Robbins who is a highly experienced safety professional who has written and conducted many other safety education classes in his career.  He has joined our effort to promote understanding of hazard recognition as an “Associate” of Potter and Associates International, Inc.
Our company is scheduling open enrollments of Carl Potter’s Hazard Recognition and Control Workshop all over the United States conducted by Stan or myself.  These workshops give clients an opportunity to attend and review the workshop to see if this is worth bring into their workplace.  I hope you will consider attending or sending people to  one of the locations in the following months.  We are also available to conduct an onsite Pilot workshop that includes a walk-through the previous day.  Many clients have found this to be the best choice, so that they can also take advantage of a third-party walk-through.  The pilot class comes with a money back guarantee that you will want to know ask our account manager about.
If you want to prevent injuries in your workplace we are ready to work with you.  Please email me at carl@potterandassociates.com to schedule a conference call, schedule a pilot class or just receive more information.
It is my hope that you will consider this workshop and join us in the effort of preventing workplace injuries, so the everyone can go home every day to their families without injury.

Please pass this information on to other who are interested in preventing workplace injuries
Thanks, and Be Safe!
Carl Potter

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